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Welcome to the event schedule and directory for the 13th Annual Salt Lake County Watershed Symposium, November 20-21, 2019. Free and open to all, the Symposium encourages a comprehensive review of the current state of our watershed while creating learning and networking opportunities for a broad array of stakeholders. Sessions cover a broad range of topics on water quality and watershed issues with local, regional, and national relevance. Hosted by Salt Lake County Watershed Planning & Restoration.

Powerpoints and audio recordings are available. Click on a session and scroll down to the attached files.
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Thursday, November 21 • 1:10pm - 1:40pm
Low Impact Development; Breaking the High Back Curb

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Low Impact Development; Breaking the High Back Curb

Summary:
Water quality regulation is about to encourage low impact development when the State retention standard goes effective expected March of 2020. With this new and significant permit requirement, there is an opportunity to shape how stormwater runoff is managed potentially improving stormwater management in unexpected ways.

Full Abstract:
Many green infrastructure designs today encourage more open space and direct runoff to local pocket ponds or open space areas. Also the flood control infrastructure is often a separate system and collecting runoff to local pocket pond systems many times results in water that remains on the surface. In addition, the requirement for more open space can increase development and maintenance cost. Perhaps this drainage model is influenced by the current norm which is to convey runoff to central areas, remove it as far away from the dwellings as possible and have government or private association entities maintain it. Water quality regulation is about to put green infrastructure into high gear when the State retention standard goes effective expected March of 2020. The retention standard will result in low impact development or at the very least traditional drainage systems with retention rather than detention ponds. With the new and significant permit requirement, there is an opportunity to shape how stormwater runoff is managed. If regulators and development are unified improving stormwater management is possible in unexpected ways, including decreased flooding, improve water quality, reduced impact fees and perhaps reduce overall government and private association system maintenance cost at the same time. The low impact development project I am most impressed with is the Lucky Estates Subdivision flood control and water quality control system. The design accomplishes flood control protection to a 10 year 24 hour volume, exceeds the anticipated permit retention standard, evenly distributes the runoff impact across the site reducing surface water depths, applies natures water quality approach and distributes a portion of system maintenance responsibility to local property owners who are contributing to the runoff impacts. The presentation discusses this systems flood control and water quality pros and cons. The lessons learned and issues that should be considered to improve the system success, so this approach can become another tool among many green infrastructure approaches.

Speakers
TB

Thomas Beesley

Stormwater Manager, Riverton City
Tom has been the Stormwater Manager for Riverton City since July 2010. He started working for Riverton City in 2000 and was hired to manage flood control, stormwater capital improvement projects and the MS4 regulations. Tom holds a Civil Engineering degree from University of Utah... Read More →



Attendees (30)